Folate/Folic Acid

While folic acid and folate are often marketed as one and the same, their metabolic effects can be quite different. Folate is the bioavailable, natural form of Vitamin B9 found in a variety of plant and animal foods. Folic acid, while readily used by the body, is the synthetic form of the vitamin, often found in supplements and fortified foods. The body is more adept at using folate and will regulate healthy levels by releasing excess through the urine. That said, a supplement that includes folic acid is utilized by the body.

Did you know that’s vitamin C aids in the body’s ability to absorb folic acid? This is why is it very important that our body’s levels are always balanced.

Folate

Dark Leafy Greens (Serving Size 1 Cup) MCG= Microgram

  • Spinach = 263 mcg
  • Collard Greens = 177 mcg
  • Turnip Greens = 170 mcg
  • Mustard Greens = 103 mcg
  • Romaine Lettuce = 76 mcg
  • Sunflower Seeds = 82 mcg (1/4 cup)
  • Flax Seeds = 54 mcg (2 tbs)
  • Peanuts = 88 mcg (1/4 cup)
  • Almonds = 46 mcg (1 cup)

 

Folic Acid

  • Aparagus = 262 mcg (1cup)
  • 1 Avocado = 90 mcg (1 cup)
  • 1 Papaya = 115 mcg
  • 1 Orange = 40 mcg
  • 1 Grapefruit = 30 mcg
  • Strawberries = 25 mcg (1 cup)

Many Beans, Peas and Lentils are high in Folic Acid, just to name a few.

  • Lentils = 358 mcg (1cup)
  • Pinto Beans = 294 mcg (1cup)
  • Split Peas = 127 mcg (1 cup)

 

There are a lot more that contain folic acid or folate, for example, Cauliflower, beets, corn, celery, canned refried beans carrots, and squash.

 

 

 

 

Works Cited:

 

  1. Dr. Edward Group DC, NP, DACBN, DCBCN, DABFM Global Healing Center 2015

2. Wardlaw GM. Perspectives in Nutrition, 4th Ed. Boston, MA: McGraw-Hill; 1999.

3. Buse, Mark BSc., Ct., CWR, Synergistic Vitamins & Supplements

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